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Colombia 1 Japan 2

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Colombia’s kit has 1990 as its reference point, though back then red was the first-choice colour with yellow the back-up. Apparently, the white shorts and socks are a preference of manager José Pékerman.

Their goalkeeper David Ospina wore a green Squadra 17 shirt rather than the template used by every other adidas goalkeeper It had dark green trim whereas the shorts and socks had white.

Japan’s shirts look plain on first viewing, but they are enlivened by a series of navy pinstripes and white dashes – described as a modern interpretation of a traditional kimono design.

Poland 1 Senegal 2

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Nike said that the diagonal graphic on the Poland shirt “represents the pride of the eagle cutting through the competition”. Ahem.

Senegal are nicknamed the Lions of Teranga and their shirts feature a lion’s face in a tribal pattern, the only real flourish added to a teamwear kit.

Japan 2 Senegal 2

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Senegal’s white kit was a simple reversal of the green strip.

Poland 0 Colombia 3

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The orange on the Colombia change strip pays tribute to the fact that the country’s home shirts were once this colour – the shirt design isn’t a million miles from the Spain home. The default shorts for the kit are orange, but blue were worn here.

Goalkeeper David Ospina had the ‘proper’ adidas template this time, the colors a nod to René Higuita’s 1990 shirt.

Japan 0 Poland 1

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Japan still progressed despite defeat, having had a better disciplinary record than Senegal, with whom they finished level on points.

These two teams were the only ones not to wear a change kit in the group stages, though Poland did don white alternative shorts here.

Colombia 1 Senegal 0

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Ospina wore a third different shirt as Colombia topped the group.